Meet the Maker

Seoyoung Shin

Gathering the Threads

Malmö-based designer Seoyoung Shin trained as an interior design architect in her native Korea before pursuing a master’s degree in design management in Milan.
Following several high-pressure years in strategy and marketing in the luxury industry, a three year sabbatical study leave at Swedish crafts and design school Capellagården (where her husband Kunsik Choi was also studying at the time) led the couple to make some life-altering changes. Relocating to Sweden was one of them, starting her own brand another.
We spoke to Shin about her newfound love for weaving and why she decided to found textile brand Boiida.

Text and photography: Micha van Dinther

What is your vision for the Boiida brand?

As textile has become such a large part of my life, the idea of creating a textile brand came very naturally. I wanted to create a line of everyday linen textile items, something we live with and use daily. Boiida is my idea of the ideal everyday textile brand, with products of high quality, made in a good way and at an affordable price. Achieving this combination turned out to be a challenge, but I feel Boiida has succeeded. The line isn’t life-changing, but it adds small moments of joy to everyday life.

 

Boiida’s products are manufactured by Klässbols Linneväveri, purveyor to the Swedish royal household. How did you start working together?

I visited factories around Sweden and had a hard time finding someone who could meet my standards and needs. Our dear friend Carina Seth Andersson suggested that I reach out to Klässbols. She introduced us to each other, and I was very impressed by their warm welcome, even though I wasn’t a well-established name on the Swedish design scene.

Can you tell us about the creative process behind your linen goods?

I’m not very brave when it comes to drawing, so I usually start off with a mini sketch of whatever I am creating, trying out colours and patterns. They are the size of a stamp. Once I decide on something I like, I sketch out a bigger version. I then make a technical drawing and start weaving. During this phase I also like to improvise a bit. My process is really very simple. Those prototypes are then sent to Klässbol, who return samples to me before I finalise the design.

 

I feel that your colour combinations and fabric textures are what make Boiida so unique. How do you think about colour and texture?

Before relocating to Sweden, I would always wear black, grey or navy clothes, but weaving introduced me to colour. I enjoy playing with different colour combinations and I realised that I had all this colour deep within me. I wouldn’t say my style is colourful, but colour is certainly the first thing I think about when I start on something new. As for waffle weaving, the traditional technique I opted for in the entire line, I really like the three-dimensional and tactile properties it has. 

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